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Week 6 (11/05/2020)

Friday 15th May 2020

 

Adjectives with –er and -est

 

What do you notice about the words below:

Strong

Stronger

Strongest

 

Have a look at these next 3 words:

Fast

Faster

Fastest

 

We call these adjectives comparative adjectives.

If we compare more than three things, we use superlative adjectives.

 

Have a go at your first worksheets below:

Look at these words:

Big            Bigger               Biggest

Fast         Faster              Fastest

When we are using comparative and superlative adjectives, we often use the suffixes er and est.

Adding er and est to these words is easy!

 

short + er = shorter           short + est = shortest

long + er = longer               long + est = longest

great + er = greater           great + est = greatest

 

Adding er and est to words that end in y:

pretty + er = prettier         pretty + est = prettiest

tasty + er = tastier            tasty + est = tastiest

 

If the adjective ends in a y, we change it to an i!

 

Adding er and est to words that end in e:

wise + er = wiser                        wise + est = wisest

strange + er = stranger              strange + est = strangest

 

If the adjective ends in an e, we knock the e off!

 

Have a go at the worksheet below:

Friday Challenge

 

  1. Click the link below
  2. Click on Summer Term – Week 3 (w/c 4th May)
  3. Click on lesson 5
  4. Watch the video on the left

 

 https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-3/

 

When you've watched it, have a go at the worksheets below!

                       ___________________________________________

Thursday 14th May 2020

 

Questions and commands

 

There are four basic sentence types in the English language:

Question: How much does it cost?

Commands: Let me drive your car.

Statements: The car is blue.

Exclamation: What a cool car!

 

Today, we are going to concentrate on questions and commands.

Questions:

  • Questions ask something.
  • They start with a capital letter and finish with a question mark.
  • They can be answered.
  • They include a question word e.g. what, where, how, when, why, which, who, does, is, should…

How much is it?

What is behind the sofa?

When does the film finish?

How do you like your eggs in the morning?

 

Command:

  • A command is an order – giving someone an instruction or telling them to do something.
  • It usually begins with an imperative bossy verb e.g. get, do, switch, tidy…
  • It can be negative e.g. ‘Don’t stop!’
  • It can end with either a full stop or an exclamation mark

Get in the bath.

Get out of here!

Eat your sprouts.

Take of your shoes and place them under the bench.

 

 

Have a go at the worksheets below:

Multiply and divide by 3

 

  1. Click the link below
  2. Click on Summer Term – Week 3 (w/c 4th May)
  3. Click on lesson 4
  4. Watch the video on the left

 

 https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-3/

 

When you've watched it, have a go at the worksheets below!

                       ___________________________________________

Wednesday 13th May 2020

 

Co-ordination

 

Every sentence has a clause.

A clause is a group of words that has a subject and a verb.

 

Jessica ran to the shop.

 

When we join two clauses together, they become complex or compound sentences. We already know at least one way to do this – by using and.

 

Jessica ran to the shop. She bought a chocolate bar.

Jessica ran to the shop and bought a chocolate bar.

 

We often want to join our clauses together to make our writing more interesting to read. When we do this we use conjunctions.

 

When we are joining two clauses together that are as important to each other and that could be individual sentences, we use a co-ordinating conjunction.

 

There are many examples of co-ordinating conjunctions but we are going to look more carefully at three of them:

and           but           or

 

Each of these has a different job.

 

and – is used when we are adding more information to a sentence.

but – is used when we are contrasting things.

or – is used when we are writing about alternatives.

  

Have a go at the worksheet below:

Subtract Money

 

  1. Click the link below
  2. Click on Summer Term – Week 3 (w/c 4th May)
  3. Click on lesson 3
  4. Watch the video on the left

 

 https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-3/

 

When you've watched it, have a go at the worksheets below!

                       ___________________________________________

Tuesday 12th May 2020

 

Forming nouns using -ness

 

What type of words are these?

 

Happy       sad           forgetful          bright       sick               ill              clever       greedy

 

Well done, they are all adjectives.

Adjectives describe something or someone.

 

The boy was sleepy.

The king was greedy.

Her classmate was helpful.

The girl was lazy.

 

We can change some adjectives into nouns by adding a suffix!

 

A suffix is a group of letters that we add to the end of a word to change its meaning.

 

To change an adjective into a noun, we can add the suffix

-ness

 

A noun ending in ‘ness’ means a state of being. For example tiredness is the state of being tired.

 

Most of the time, adding –ness is simple!

Sad + ness = sadness

Tired + ness = tiredness

 

When the adjective ends in a ‘y’, we usually change the ‘y’ to an ‘i’ and then add the ness.

 

Happy

Happi + ness = happiness

 

Lonely

Lonli + ness = loneliness

 

Crazy

Crazi + ness = craziness

 

Have a go at the worksheets below:

Add Money

 

  1. Click the link below
  2. Click on Summer Term – Week 3 (w/c 4th May)
  3. Click on lesson 2
  4. Watch the video on the left

 

 https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-3/

 

When you've watched it, have a go at the worksheets below!

                       ___________________________________________

Monday 11th May 2020

 

Forming adjectives using –ful -less

 

What is a suffix?

A suffix is a group of letters we add to the end of a word to change its meaning.

There are lots of different suffixes. Today we are going to look more carefully at the suffixes:

-ful

and

-less

 

Look at the two words below:

 

Use           help

 

These words can be used as a verb (doing word).

When we add one of our suffixes, the word becomes an adjective!

 

They could not use the broken car.

The broken car was useless.

 

He couldn’t help the injured bird.

He felt helpless.

 

The suffix –ful often means ‘being ful of’ or having lots of. For examples, useful means being full of use or having lots of use.

 

When  we use the suffix –ful on the end of words we only write one letter l.

 

The suffix –less is often the oppositve of –ful and means having none. So useless means having no use.

 

When we add the suffixes –ful and –less, we usually just add them on to the end of the root word.

 

Care -> careful

Care -> careless

Mind -> mindless

 

When the root word ends in a y, we usually change the y into an I before adding the suffix.

 

Beauty -> beautiful

Plenty -> plentiful

 

Have a go at the worksheets below:

Converting pounds and pence

 

  1. Click the link below
  2. Click on Summer Term – Week 3 (w/c 4th May)
  3. Click on lesson 1
  4. Watch the video on the left

 

 https://whiterosemaths.com/homelearning/year-3/

 

When you've watched it, have a go at the worksheets below!
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