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10.7.20

 

It's arithmetic today!

 

We have done this test before so go back and dig out your arithmetic test 8 score from last time and see if you can improve on it today.

 

Good luck!

9.7.20

LI: To identify right angles in shapes 

 

Today you will be continuing your work from last week by further identifying right angles in different shapes. 

 

Remember, a right angle is always 90 degrees. 

 

Task 1- watch the video below. This will help you further when you are completing your task sheet today. 

Year 3 - Week 9 - Lesson 1 - Right angles in shapes

Task 2- Now have a go at the questions below! 

8.7.20

LI: To identify parallel and perpendicular lines. 


We see lines everywhere around us all the time, for example on buildings, books, televisions, photo frames, roads etc.

 

We learnt how to identify some different types of lines in yesterday's lesson and today we are going to look more closely at identifying parallel lines and perpendicular lines in shapes.

 

Watch the first video on the website below to recap horizontal and vertical lines. 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/z64kvwx

 

Parallel lines are two lines that are always the same distance apart and never meet, just like railway tracks.

 

To show that two lines are parallel, you draw matching arrows on each line facing the

same direction.

 

 

Perpendicular lines are lines that meet at a right angle (90°), like a corner of a room or the edge of a book. 

 

To show that two lines are perpendicular, you draw the right-angle sign in the corner where the two lines meet.

 

 

 

Task 2- Now watch the learning video below, this will help you in your next task!

Parallel, Perpendicular & Intersecting Lines Song

Task 3- Now it’s time to complete your worksheet! Have fun!

7.7.20

LI: To describe different types of lines


We see lines everywhere around us all the time, for example on buildings, books, televisions, photo frames, roads etc. Different types of lines have different names;  

Types of lines

 

A vertical line goes up and down.

A horizontal line goes left to right.

 

 

Task 1- have a look around your house, can you find anything that looks to have a vertical or horizontal line? Copy the grid below, draw the object and name the line.

 

Object Picture  Line 
     
     

 

Now have a look at the pencils below. Can you count how many vertical and horizontal pencils there are?

 

 

How many did you find? You can see that there are 4 vertical pencils and 4 horizontal pencils.

 

Task 2- Now watch the second video on the website below. 

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zxc9ydm

 

Task 3- Now it’s time to complete the worksheet, have a go at all of the questions!

6.7.20

LI: To compare angles

 

An angle is the space between two lines that start at the same point. 

We measure angles in degrees. The degree symbol looks like this °. We show it next to a number like this 90°.

 

Types of angles:

Angles can be between 0° and 360° (which is a full circle) and depending on the size of the angle, they are called different things:

 

A right angle looks like the corner of a square or the edge of a book. 

It is a perfect 90°, which is often shown by a small square drawn in between the two lines.

 

 

An acute angle is an angles that is less than 90°. This makes them smaller than a right angle.

 

A good way to remember this angle is to think that because it is small, it is “a cute” angle.

 

 

An obtuse angle is an angle that is bigger than 90°degrees, but doesn’t reach a straight line at 180°.

 

 

Task 1- watch the video below. This will give you a more in depth look at comparing angles. 

 

Year 3 - Week 9 - Lesson 2 - Compare angles

When you compare two angles, you have to think to yourself, is it smaller or bigger than 90°?

 

Example 1:

Look at this shape, known as a quadrilateral (a four-sided, two-dimensional shape).

Angle A is a right angle.

 

 

Which angles are acute angles?

 

Look carefully at the other angles and compare them to the right angle. Which angles are smaller?

 

B and D are acute angles because they’re clearly smaller than a right angle.

That means angle C is an obtuse angle because it is larger than angle A.

 

Task 2- Now complete the worksheet below. The information above will help you to answer the questions. 

3.7.20

 

It's arithmetic today!

 

We have also done this test before so go back and dig out your arithmetic test 6 score from last time and see if you can improve on it today.

2.7.20

LI: To recognise right angles in shapes. 

 

Today you will be learning about right angles in different shapes. You will need to use the knowledge you have gained over the past few days to help you. 

 

 

 

 

Task 1-

 

Write your full name in capital letters, like the examples opposite. 

 

Highlight all the right angles – how many are there?

 

Which capital letter has the most right-angles?

 

Tip: Use the corner of a piece of paper to check for Right angles. 

 

For example; 

 

 

Task 2- Now watch the video below. This will help you answer the next set of questions. 

Year 3 - Week 9 - Lesson 1 - Right angles in shapes

Task 3- 

 

Make your own right-angle checker

 

For this activity, you are going to make your own right-angle checker.

  1. Draw around a round object, such as a tin, to make a circle. 
  2. Divide the circle into four equal sections, then cut one of these out, so it looks something like the image opposite. 
  3. Finally, turn over your right-angle checker and decorate it however you like – why not add an eye and some teeth?

1.7.20

LI: To recognise and describe 3D shapes. 

 

Today you will be recognizing and describing 3D shapes. 

 

To describe 3D shapes, we talk about faces, edges and vertices. Look at the diagram below, this will tell you where to find each of them. 

 

 

Watch the video below; this gives you information about different kinds of 3D shapes.

3D Shapes Song For Kids | Spheres, Cylinders, Pyramids, Cubes, & Cones

Fun fact: Some 3D shapes have curved faces

 

Task 1- Now watch the video below, this will help you when you come to answering the questions on the next activity. 

Year 3 - Week 10 - Lesson 3 - Recognise and describe 3D shapes

Task 2- Now have a go at the questions. 

30.6.20

LI: To recognise and describe 2d shapes. 

 

2D shapes have sides and corners and are completely flat. Much like circles, triangles, squares, rectangles, pentagons, hexagons and octagons!

 

2d shapes have vertices (corners) and sides. For example the pentagon below has 5 sides and 5 vertices. Count them below. 

 

 

Look at the poster below. It includes the 2d shapes that you will come across in todays lesson, this poster also includes the properties of each shape. 

 

Name each shape out loud and make a note of the properties of the shape (facts about the shape) 

 

 

Task 1- watch the video below. 

Polygons Song For Kids | A Geometry Rap | 3rd, 4th, & 5th Grade

 

Task 2- 

 

Now have a go at describing the properties of the shape below. Remember we are looking for a description of how many sides and vertices the shape has. 

 

Use the sentence stem below. 

 

This shape has _____ sides. 

 

This shape has ____ vertices. 

 

I think this shape is a ______ because I know that________. 

 

 

 

Task 3- Now watch this video. This will help you with todays task sheets. 

Year 3 - Week 10 - Lesson 2 - Recognise and describe 2D shapes

Task 4- Now have a go at answering the questions on the task sheet.

 

Remember, you can watch the videos more than once and you can use our 2D shape property map to help!

29.6.20

LI: To measure accurately 

 

This week we are going to be learning all about measurement. 

 

When we are measuring in school, we often use a ruler. However there are lots of different types of measuring equipment that we can use, and we don’t just measure length! 

 

For example; 

 

 

Today we are going to be focusing on measuring LENGTH accurately. Look at the slide below, this shows that we can work in;

 

Kilometers (km) Metres (m) Centimeters (cm) and Millimeters (mm). 

 

 

When we are measuring the length of an object, we ALWAYS start at 0cm, we DON’T start at the edge of the ruler– if you do this your measurements will not be accurate. 

 

Task 1- watch the video below, this will give you further Information about measuring accurately.

 

Year 3 - Week 10 - Lesson 1 - Draw accurately

Task 2- Now complete the task sheet below. If you do not have a ruler at home don’t worry, you could print out the one below!

26.6.20

 

It's arithmetic today! How did you get on with the fractions questions last week? You should definitely find question 7 easier this week. We have also done this test before so go back and dig out your arithmetic test 6 score from last time and see if you can improve on it today.

Arithmetic Test 6

25.6.20

 

Today you will be applying your subtraction skills from yesterday to problems. Have a quick read over yesterday's lesson if you need to.

 

 

What will the answer be here? Use a number line if you need to, or just think carefully about what many parts you are starting with and what you are subtracting.

 

 

Answer:

Remember, when the denominators are the same, it will stay the same in the answer.

 

 

Look carefully at this one. What do you need to subtract from 11/12 to end with 4/12?

 

 

 

Answer:

 

 

What subtraction is this showing? Write each fraction out.

 

 

Answer:

 

 

 

Picture what is happening here. Draw the cake if you need to. Write the fractions out as numbers and it will be more clear.

 

 

Answer:

 

 

 

Do Seren's calculation first. What does she have? Now compare that to Jack.

 

Seren does 11/12 - 4/12 which = 7/12.

 

 

Have a go at these similar problems from Classroom Secrets. The questions get more challenging as you go down the sheet so choose the ones that best suit you. Try to challenge yourself. Check your answers using the answer sheet at the end the page.

24.6.20

 

Today we are subtracting fractions with the same denominator and it works in pretty much the same way as addition with the same denominator. Remember, the denominator just tells us how many parts the whole has been split into, not how many parts we have; the numerator tells us how many parts we are using.

 

This webpage will help you with this too: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/znggp4j

You can try some of the additional activities on there.

 

Look at the fraction block below. The yellow parts represent a fraction of the whole and the orange parts represent another part of the whole.

 

 

Answer:

 

 

 

 

Just like with addition, when the denominators are the same in the subtraction, the denominator will stay the same in the answer.

 

 

The fraction block is split into 10 equal part, and each one represents one tenth 1/10 (scroll down to the work on tenths if you are unsure of this).

10/10 is a whole, so we call it 1. We are subtracting 6/10, so we count back 6 tenths. We land on 4 tenths.

 

 

Here is another example:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23.6.20

 

Today's lesson will involve solving problems using addition with fractions. It builds on yesterday's lesson so if you haven't done that then scroll down and do that first.

 

These 2 problems both involve adding 3 lots of fractions, but all 3 have the same denominator so it works in the same way as yesterday.

In problem A, you have 2/9 + 4/9 + 1/9. As the denominators are the same we just need to count up the numerators. 2 + 4 + 1 = 7, so the final answer will be 7/9. Can you try problem B?

 

Answer:

 

Can you work out what the missing numerator and denominator would be here? Think carefully about what will happen to the denominator.

 

Answer:

The numerator is 2 because you need the total to come to 5, but the denominator won't change so that stays as 6.

 

 

True or false?

 

Answer:

The denominators in the addition are the same so the denominator in the answer should be 11. Remember, we are not adding the denominators; that number just tells us how many equal parts there are altogether. 

 

 

This question is similar but presented in a different way. Can you explain if Quinn is correct or not?

 

Answer:

 

 

Now have a go at some of the questions on these sheets. They are in a similar style. They get harder as you go down the sheet so do the ones that are the right level for you. The answers are at the end so you can see how you did.

Classroom Secrets Fractions Involving Addition

22.6.20

 

Today we will be using our understanding of fractions to add fractions with the same denominator.

 

The information on this page will help you https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zhfs2v4

There are extra activities on there as well.

 

 

 

Both pizzas have been cut into 6 equal parts, so each pizza has been cut into sixths. We can represent the slices like this:

 

The two pizzas are in sixths. This means that each slice from both pizzas are equal. When the two fractions have the same amount of parts, they will have the same denominator. When the denominators are equal, we just add the numerators together but the denominator stays the same.

 

Try these:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Task 1:

 

 

 

Answers:

 

 

 

Task 2:

19.6.20

 

It's arithmetic today! You should be finding the fractions questions easier now that we have covered them in our maths lessons. We have also done this test before so go back and dig out your arithmetic test 5 score from last time and see if you can improve on it today.

 

 

 

 

Arithmetic Test 5

18.6.20

 

 

 

Task 1:

 

Task 2:

 

 

 

 

 

These fractions are arranged in ascending order (that means they go from smallest to largest).

The last one - ten tenths - means you have a whole. If you think back to your work on tenths, it would be equal to 1.

 

Task 3: You can just point to the correct answer on the screen or write/draw it on your own paper.

 

Task 4:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

 

 

 

Task 1: one half

 

Task 2: Sophia is correct. One twelfth (1/12) has a larger denominator than one sixth (1/6) which means the whole has been split into more pieces. If it has been split into more pieces, then each piece needs to be smaller. It is like sharing a birthday cake between 12 people or 6 people; if there are 12 people, each person will get a smaller piece.

 

Task 3:

1) A and B

2) A, B and C

 

Task 4: Neither of them are correct. This is because 3/4 is equivalent to 6/8 and so they will both get the same amount of sweets. You could prove this with a bar model, on a fraction wall, or by multiplying the numerator and denominator of 3/4 by 2.

 

17.6.20

 

This lesson builds on what you learnt on Monday and Tuesday about equivalent fractions. 

 

Remember, we can represent the same fraction in different ways and we call these equivalent fractions.

 

The two videos on this page explain how to identify and find equivalent fractions.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zbqkvwx

The videos on that page will really help you with today's challenges.

 

When you are finding a missing numerator or denominator, you need to multiply or divide both numbers by the same amount.

 

If you are multiplying the denominator by 2 then you need to multiply the numerator by 2 also.

 

If you are dividing the numerator by 5 then you need to divide the denominator by 5 as well.

 

Task 1:

 

 

Task 2:

These 2 questions need you to use your learning from Monday, Tuesday and today. Make sure you explain your answers in full sentences but you should also use drawings and calculations to support your answers.

 

 

16.6.20

 

Today we will continue with our work on equivalent fractions. Look back over yesterday's lesson if you need a quick reminder.

 

A lot of this information can be found at https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/znsc86f with different tasks for you to try.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can you spot a pattern with these fractions that are all equivalent to a half? Compare the numerator (top number) to the denominator (bottom number).

 

Each numerator is half of the denominator. This happens for all fractions that are equivalent to a half.

 

Can you spot a pattern with other equivalent fractions?

 

 

 

Task: Use your knowledge of equivalent fractions to complete the equivalent fractions here.

 

15.6.20

 

This week we will be looking some more at fractions. We will be identifying equivalent fractions and comparing fractions.

 

The information on this page, particularly the videos, will help you with this lesson:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zm6rkxs

 

 

 

All the other shapes have one half shaded and one half not shaded. A half can be represented in lots of different ways!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Make sure you have watched both videos before you complete this task

 

Task: Use the fraction wall to find as many equivalent fractions as you can.

 

You can download the blank fraction wall below and print it out, you can draw your own, or you can write out the equivalent fractions like in the example above. 

 

Blank Fraction Wall

12.6.2020

 

As today is Friday it is Arithmetic day! Find the arithmetic sheet below that is labelled 2. Give yourself 20 minutes to complete it, you could ask an adult to set a timer for you. 

 

Have fun!

11.6.20

 

11.6.20- To recognise fractions of amounts using objects.

 

Today you will be continuing with your work from yesterday, however you will now be focusing on fractions of amounts using objects to work out your answers.  However today, you will not just be finding, for example ½ of an object, today the Numerators will be increasing. 

 

Look at the piece of information below- you will need to use your knowledge of unit and non-unit fractions from last week!

 

 

Look at the example below, this a non-unit fraction. This will show you how to find a non-unit fraction of an amount using objects. 

 

 

Task 1- watch the video below, this will give you a better idea of how to use the bar model, objects and your knowledge of division to find a fraction of an amount. Listen carefully!

Fractions of amounts using the bar model

Task 2- Now have a go at this question below. 

 

 

Task 3- Now watch this video, this will give you further examples of how to answer the different questions that you will see on your task sheet today. 

Year 3 - Week 6 - Lesson 4 - Fractions of a set of objects (2)

Task 4- You have now watched both videos, have a go at answering the rest of the questions on the task sheet. 

10.6.20- To understand fractions of a set of objects.

 

Today you are going to be working on fractions of a set of objects, for example; if I had 6 counters and wanted to show what 1 half of them would look, I would divide 6 by the denominator 2. Therefore 6 divided by 2 = 3. So ½ of 6 counters is 3 counters. 

 

We call this method equal sharing. Look at the example below. Here you will find there are 15 teddy bears, I want to know how many teddy bears I would have if I had 1/5 of them. 

 

We look at the denominator which is 5, this tells us to DIVIDE (share) our 15 teddy bears 5 times. 

 

Therefore 1/5 of the teddy bears would be 3. 

 

 

Task 1- Watch the video below, this will explain in more detail how to answer varied questions about fractions of objects. 

Year 3 - Week 6 - Lesson 3 - Fractions of a set of objects (1)

This is "Year 3 - Week 6 - Lesson 3 - Fractions of a set of objects (1)" by White Rose Maths on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people...

Task 2- Now that you have watched the video, have a go at the question below. 

 

Task 3- Now have a go at the rest of the activities on the sheet below

9.6.20- To recognise fractions on a number line. 

 

Today you will be working on fractions on a number line. We have already looked, this year at placing numbers on a number line. 

 

For example if we had a number line that was divided into 10 equal parts like the one below, with 0 at 1 side and 10 at the other side the intervals would be counting in 1’s

 

 

 

Using a number line when working with fractions works in a similar sort of way. Except the numbers will now be fractions. So if the number line was DIVIDED into 10 equal parts, each part would represent 1/10 and so on. 

 

TOP TIP: We need to look at the denominator to tell us how many equal parts the whole will be divided into. Unless the numerator is greater than the whole. 

 

Task 1- watch the video below. This will give a better idea of how to work with fractions on a number line. 

 

Task 2- Now that you have watched the first video, give the task below a go. Remember to look at the denominator to decide on how many parts your number line is divided in.

 

 

Task 3- Now watch the second video. This will give you an idea about how to answer the rest of the questions!

Year 3 - Week 6 - Lesson 2 - Fractions on a number line

This is "Year 3 - Week 6 - Lesson 2 - Fractions on a number line" by White Rose Maths on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

Task 4- Now answer the rest of the questions on the sheet

8.6.20- To recognise tenths as decimals.

 

Last week we looked at counting in tenths. A tenth is where, for example, a number or object is DIVIDED into 10 equal parts. 

 

Today we will be using numbers not objects. We will be focusing on 1, the value 1 can be divided in 10 equal parts. Each part is then worth 1/10th  or 0.1. However, when we count in tenths the parts increase by 1/10th or 0.1 each time. 

 

As above, Tenths can also be recognised as decimals. This would mean that 1/10th is equal to 0.1 and so on. Look at the number line below.

 

Remember that we can count in tenths above 1, for example; 12/10 would be 1.2 in decimal form. The video below will make this clearer.

 

 

Task 1- Watch the video below. This will give you a better idea of tenths as decimals.

Year 3 Lesson: Tenths to Decimals

Task 2- Now have a go at the activity below. 

 

 

Task 3- Now watch the second video. This will give you an idea of how to answer the rest of the questions on the sheet. 

Year 3 - Week 6 - Lesson 1 - Tenths as decimals

Task 4- Now you have watched both videos open the document below. You will find several questions and one that you completed earlier. 

5.6.2020

 

As today is Friday it is Arithmetic day! Find the arithmetic sheet below that is labelled 2. Give yourself 20 minutes to complete it, you could ask an adult to set a timer for you. 

 

Have fun! 

20 Minute Countdown Timer

4.6.20 - To count in tenths. 

 

Today you will be building on your knowledge from yesterday and using it today to count in tenths. Look at the number line below to help you along the way!

 

 

You can also count beyond 10/10. For example, 11/10, 12/10, 13/10 etc.

 

Task 1- 

Now watch this video, this will give you more information about how to answer questions when counting in tenths. 

Year 3 - Week 5 - Lesson 4 - Count in tenths

Task 2- 

Now answer the question below, remember you can watch the video more than once if you need to. Remember when you are working on your answer, each line represent 1/10th 

 

 

Task 3- 

Now answer the question below, remember you can watch the video more than once if you need to.

 

 

Challenge: 

 

3.6.20- To make tenths

 

Today you will be looking at tenths as fractions. A tenth can be a  fraction, the denominator will be 10 and the numerator can be 1-10. 

 

Look at the pictures below, they all represent different tenths. Which ones could you add together to make a whole tenth?

 

 

Task 1- 

watch the video below, this will give you more information about making tenths. 

Year 3 - Week 5 - Lesson 3 - Tenths

Task 2- 

Now that you have watched the video you will need to complete the questions below.

 

Take your time and watch the video again if you need to.

 

Remember your making tenths. Remember to draw the diagram if you need to- it will help!

 

2.3.20- To make a whole

 

Today you will be continuing your practice of fractions by looking at making the whole. This means that you will be developing your knowledge of making a whole fraction rather than a fraction in parts.

 

Look at the picture below, this will give you an idea of whole fractions. Can you think of anymore?

 

 

Now watch this video to find out more about fractions-as a whole (it also gives other little bits of information, so listen carefully.)

Task 1- Now that you have watched the first video, give this question a go. Instead of circling the fractions, write them down on your paper. 

 

 

Task 2- Watch the video below, this will teach you how to make a whole. 

Year 3 - Week 5 - Lesson 2 - Making the whole

Task 3- 

Now answer the questions on the sheet below. 

 

1.6.20 - To recognise unit and non unit fractions. 

 

Today you will be learning about unit (a fraction where the numerator is one and the denominator is 1 and more) and non unit (a fraction where the numerator is greater than 1) fractions. There will be several opportunities for you to read and learn this skill.

 

Above, you will see a fraction knowledge organiser, keep looking at this as it will help you this week. 

 

Task 1-

Your first task today is to look at and read the words below; 

 

Numerator- is the top number, it represents how many equal parts of a whole are needed.

Denominator- is the bottom number, it represents how many equal parts in a whole.

Unit fraction- a fraction where the numerator is one and the denominator is 1 and more.

Non unit fraction- a fraction where the numerator is greater than 1.

 

Can you represent these key words with a diagram using what you already know about fractions?

 

Task 2- 

Now you need to watch the video below- this will tell you how to find unit and non unit fractions.

 

https://vimeo.com/418151464

 

Task 3-

Let’s try this question together

 

 

Task 4- 

Now answer the questions below. Use all  your knowledge and remember you can watch the video more than once. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22.5.20

 

As today is Friday it is Arithmetic day! Find the arithmetic sheet below that is labelled 2. Give yourself 20 minutes to complete it, you could ask an adult to set a timer for you. 

 

Have fun! 

Arithmetic

21.5.20

 

Today you will be working on ordering numbers to 1000. You will need all of the knowledge that you have gained over this week, in order to apply it to todays learning. 

 

When you see two numbers that look the ones below you need to decide whether they are greater, less than or equal to each other before you decide how to order them. 

 

For example: 

 

323, 250, 75

 

If we were to order the numbers above from smallest to largest we need to first look at the hundreds column. 

 

We know by looking at 75 compared to the other numbers that it does not have a hundred in it, therefore that is the smallest number. 

 

We then look at 250 and 323, we know, by looking in the hundreds column that 200 is less than 300 so 250 is the next smallest number. 

 

We then look at 323, we know that 323 is bigger that 250 therefore it is the largest number. 

 

So the order would be 75, 250, 323. 

 

However,

You many see a sequence that looks like this; 

154, 103, 144

 

In this case we cannot look at the hundreds column as each of the 3 numbers begin with a 100 in the hundreds column. 

 

We Would have to look at the tens column to decide on the order from smallest to largest, much like we did with the above example.

 

What is the correct order of the numbers above? Write it down. 

 

Task 1- Watch the video below to give you a further idea of how we order and compare numbers to 1000. 

Comparing and Ordering Numbers to 1000

Task 2- Now complete the two questions below. Remember, as these questions are reasoning and problem solving, you will need to prove your answer.

 

 

Task 3- Now use all of your knowledge of comparing and ordering numbers to answer the questions below. 

 

20.5.20

 

Today you will be working on comparing concrete resources. You will need to remember what the words greater than, less than and equal to mean. To help you here is a video that tells you what they are and why we use them- click on the link. 

 

 

Number Gators (Greater Than, Less Than Symbols Song)

Task 1- Look at the symbols below and match the to the correct definition. 

 

 

Task 2- Now answer the questions below. Remember to use the symbols above.

 

What representation is worth more? Remember we are looking at greater than, less than and equal to.

 

 

Task 3- Now have a go at the problem solving question below. You may want to talk through this question with someone in your house. 

 

19.5.20

 

Today we will be working on number lines to 1000. Below you will see a number line that is marked from 0 to 100 and 0 to 1000- as you will see the number line is counting up in steps of 10’s or 100’s. 

 

 

Using the two number lines above you will be able to work out the missing numbers on your activities. 

 

Task 1- watch the video below, this will remind you how to count to 1000 in steps of 100. 

Skip Counting by 100 Song

Task 2- Now use your knowledge of number lines and counting to 1000 to fill in the blank number line below. 

 

 

Task 3- Using all of your knowledge, complete the question below. Remember you can use the Number lines above. 

 

 

Task 4- Now follow the link below. It will take you to a place value game. Choose the level you would like to play at. Have fun!

 

https://www.topmarks.co.uk/learning-to-count/place-value-basketball

 

 

 

 

18.5.20

 

This week we will be focussing on applying our knowledge of Place Value to Reasoning and problem solving questions. 

 

Below is a place value grid. You will be able to use this to answer this weeks questions. 

 

 

Remember, a 3 digit number will usually be made up of Hundreds, Tens and Ones. But don't forget that we can have a 3 digit number without any Tens or Ones. 

 

Use the place value grid to partition the number 307.

Can you draw what this would look like using base 10?

 

Task 1-

 

Your first task today is to watch the video below. It will remind you what place value is and why it is important to know the place value of a number. 

Place Value Song

Task 2- Complete the task below.

 

This is a True or False question, this type of questions requires you to choose an answer and explain why it is correct. You need to use True because... or False because... depending on your answer.

 

 

Task 3- Now you have reminded yourself about Place value have a go at the questions below, these will require you to think carefully and explain your answers. 

 

 

 

Now answer this questions below.

It is not as hard as it may seem, remember to think outside of the box. 

What else do you know? Remember, you know more than you think!

 

 

Task 4- 

 

Now finish your learning of by counting in 8's to 88. 

 

15.5.20

 

As today is Friday, that means one thing... It's Arithmetic day. 

 

Give yourself 20 minutes, you will find a timer below that you can click to start.

 

Arithmetic test 7

20 Minute Timer

This timer silently counts down to 0:00, then alerts you that time is up with a gentle beep sound.

14.5.20

 

Today you will be looking more closely at the 24-hour analogue clock rather than the 12-hour clock. Look at the clock below, what do you notice is different? 

 

But first, lets looks at clock that uses Roman numerals- To work out the time on this clock you will need to know what the Roman numeral stands for on the clock. Look at the information sheet below. 

 

 

Now look at the same clock again. Do the 2 clocks below show the same time?

 

 

Yes, the clocks do show the same time, we need to remember that there are 24 hours in a day not just the standard 12 that are usually on a clock. Watch the video below to help you understand this concept. 

 

 

A.M. and P.M. and the 24-Hour Clock

learn English through cartoons learning English easier to understand Học tiếng anh giao tiếp cơ bản học tiếng anh bằng video tiếng anh cho trẻ em tiếng anh t...

Task 2-

 

Now it’s time to draw your own clock. Using the template below and the information above, create your own 24-hour Roman Numeral clock. 

 

When you have labelled it correctly, write down, around the outside of the clock the actual numbers that each Roman Numeral represents. 

 

Write both the AM and PM Times!

 

 

Task 3-

Using your knowledge of roman numeral clocks. Write down the correct time that each clock below shows in both AM and PM.

 

 

Task 4-

Using your knowledge of roman numeral clocks. Write down the correct time that each clock below shows in both AM and PM.

 

 

13.5.20

 

Today you will be learning how to tell the time to the nearest 5 minutes. As yesterday we now know that there are 60 minutes in an hour.

 

Today we are going to use the fact that an hour can be divided into 5-minute intervals. 

 

If you look at the clock below you will notice that each interval is counting in 5-minute steps from 0 to 60. However, you will notice on the second clock that these intervals are not always known as 5,10,15 and so on. For example if it is 15 minutes past 3, we would say quarter past three. And if it is was 3.40, we would say 20 to 4. 

 

 

 

Task 1- watch the video below. It tells you all about telling the time to the nearest 5 minutes. 

 

Telling Time Song for Kids | Telling Time to 5 Minutes

Video: Telling Time To The Nearest 5 Minutes Grade Levels: 2nd Grade - 3rd Grade 🍎 Check out our ever-growing library of math songs at https://www.numberock....

Task 2- Now, look at the clocks below. Write down what time each clock shows, remember you looking at writing the time to the nearest 5 minutes.

 

 

Task 3- Now challenge yourself to the question below, you will need to use all that you have learned today to work out the answer to the question below.

 

 

 

12.5.20

 

Today you will be learning how to tell the time in 30-minute intervals. As you now know from your learning last week, there are 60 minutes in an hour. 

 

If we were to split those 60 minutes in half, we would have two lots of 30 minutes.

 

When you look at the clock below you will notice that we call these two halves, half past or O'clock depending on where the hands are facing. 

 

 

Task 1- watch the video below, it will describe in more detail how we tell the time in 30-minute intervals. 

Hip-Hop Around the Clock | :15, :30, :45 | Learning to Tell Time | Jack Hartmann

This song is about telling time by a quarter after, half past the hour and a quarter till the hour. This can be done with each student having their own clock...

We now need to remember that the little hand can be known, and you will see it as the hour hand. The little hand/hour hand tells you what hour it is. 

 

We also need to remember that the big hand can be known, and you will see it as the bigger of the two hands on the clock, as the minute hand. The big hand tells us how many minutes past or to the hour. 

 

Look at the example below. This is an analogue clock. You will see that the time on this clock shows half past 11- look at the description around the clock.  

 

Task 2- using the knowledge that you have learned above. What time do these two clocks show?

 

TIP: Look closely, has the hour hand gone past the 4? Has the hour hand gone past the 8?

 

Task 3- Now use all your knowledge to answer the questions below. You will notice that there are 2 questions on the right that look different, challenge yourself, what time do they show?

 

 

11.5.202

 

Today you are going to find out more about the meaning of am and pm when telling the time. You will also learn about the difference between analogue and digital clocks. 

Starter task  – Read the words below and think about their meaning.

Talk about the following key words :

Time, digital, analogue, hour, minutes, seconds,

 

What is analogue and digital time?

Click the link to learn more.
www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zkfycdm/articles/zcrmqty

 

What is am and pm?

Click the link to learn more.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrwQIYmoYhs

Tasks - When you have completed these tasks share them with your family.

Take some some time to read the time knowledge organiser below. It will help you revisit what we covered last week and will help with this weeks tasks as you move on to telling the time.

7.5.2020

 

Today you are going to learn about the links between seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks and months. You will look at converting different lengths of time too.

Time key facts poster - This will help you! It is really good to read this each day and try to remember these facts.

Here are the words to the song if you want to play it and sing along.

Lyrics to the song
Can you learn the song for when we are back at school?

A second is the length of this gong
A minute is the length of this song
And if you listened to it sixty times,
You'll have listened an hour long

 

A second is the length of this pop
A minute is sixty of them non-stop
Sixty minutes is an hour, that's way more pops
You get the idea, we can go ahead and stop the pops

 

A day has twenty-four hours
And I'm sure that you would agree
That's a lot easier to remember
Than however many seconds that that would be

 

Sixty seconds a minute
Sixty minutes an hour
Twenty-four hours a day
Is that too tough for us learn?
No way!

 

Sixty seconds a minute
Sixty minutes an hour
Twenty-four hours a day
Is that too tough for us learn?
No way Jose!

Task 1 - Read the words below and think about their meaning. Can you use each word in a sentence. Tell an adult your sentences.

 

time, days, hours, hour, minute, minutes, second, seconds, 

Task 2 - Complete this task on your paper. Write the event then how long it will take approximately. E.g. boiling a kettle - 3 minutes

Task 3 - There is no need to draw the table, you can set it out like this. a. 1 min 25sec, 1 min 30 sec, 1min 35sec.....

Task 4

Challenger - stretch your brain.

6.5.2020

 

Today you can start your maths learning with a little song to remind you about the number of days in each month. 

Click the link in orange - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bRU03b5Rt3s

Warm up task linked to yesterday’s learning

Read the information on the next few pages carefully to learn more about what we call different times during a 24 hour day. 

Read carefully

Talking task. Read and discuss the answers to complete the statements

Task 2

Don’t look until you have completed task 2. Answers revealed

5.5.2020

Today you are going to learn about months of the year and how different months are different in the number of days they have. 

 

First warm your brains up with some multiplication matching.

  • Work out each answer before matching
  • Check your answers carefully

 

Remind yourself about the months of the year.

Take a look at the calendar for this year. This year February was a leap year!

Use the calendar to help you complete the first task.

Remember: < less than            > greater than           = equals

Tasks to complete

Remember what leap year means...Extra day in Feb.
Remember what leap year means...Extra day in Feb.
Now look very closely at the calendars you see and answer the questions carefully. 

Tasks

Maths Home Learning

 

4.5.20

Good morning,

Warm your brains up by shouting out your 4 x table facts. 0, 4, 8 ....

 

This week you are going to study the topic of ‘Time’. Being able to tell the time is a very important skill you need in life.

 

Ready, steady, GO!

Task 1 – Write or talk about all the reasons why being able to tell the time is important. Make a list of reasons. E.g. To be able to get to doctors appointments for the correct time, to know how long it is until lunch time etc…

Think of as many reasons as you can... You will soon realise just how important being able to tell the time really is!

 

Task 2 – Think on your own about what you already know about time.

Write it down or share your what you know with an adult or older brother/sister. 

Can you talk about the key words:

Time, digital, analogue, hour, minutes, seconds, 12 hour clock, 24 hour clock, am, pm, morning, midday/noon, afternoon, midnight, o’clock, half past, quarter past, quarter to

Task 3 - Use the time related vocabulary to make sentences to show your knowledge about time. You can do this orally (talk out loud to an adult) if you prefer.

1.5.20 - Arithmetic

 

Find your arithmetic sheet labelled Test 4 in your Home Learning pack and have a go at completing it in 20 minutes. Use the answers to mark it yourself. You should be getting a better score than previous weeks. I have seen some good scores being posted on our Twitter page @KensingPrimary - someone got their first 20/20 last week! Who else can beat their previous score?

 

If you want an extra maths challenge today BBC Bitesize have their Friday challenges here https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zd3q2sg

30.4.20 – To apply addition and subtraction to problems

 

Today you will be applying your addition and subtraction skills to problems.

 

There are more problems along with additional explanations on BBC Bitesize here https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zfxx6v4 so check them out too.

 

Question 1 has more than one answer. Try to find as many combinations as possible for Tara’s 500 tokens. They key is to remember that she can only choose one ride and one stall each time.

 

 

For question 2, you should start by matching up the pairs that seem likely to go together. Use your estimating skills to help you with this. This will help you to narrow down the possibilities.

 

 

Question 3 needs your subtraction skills. Remember, finding change is just the same as doing a take away (the shop keeper takes away some of your money). You need to find out how much change he would get for each toy not for the toys altogether.

 

 

The answer to Q3 is below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

29.4.20 – To subtract from 3 digit numbers

 

This lesson on BBC Bitesize also explains subtraction, and there are some good videos and tasks there that you might like. Have a go!

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zvm72sg

 

Like yesterday with addition, if the numbers cannot be easily subtracted mentally, column method is often an efficient method to use.

 

Identify your hundreds, tens and ones and make sure you place them in the correct column.

 

Remember, for subtraction you must have the biggest number at the top. Again, start with your ones and subtract down the column.

 

 

Sometimes we do not have enough ones in the top row to subtract the number below, and the same for the tens. When this happens we need to regroup our numbers. This video will remind you how and why:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pv8URIRgCdo

 

Now have a go at regrouping using these questions

 

 

Use your understanding of place value or subtraction to find the missing digits in these numbers. When you are done, complete the whole calculation, or do the inverse, to ensure you are correct.

 

 

 

28.4.20 – To add 3 digit and 2 digit numbers

 

 

This lesson on BBC Bitesize will also explain what we are covering today 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/z72dwty

 

Remember, when we are adding numbers that we cannot easily add mentally, it is often best to use the column method. This method uses our understanding of hundreds, tens and ones.

 

Start with your ones and add them down the column, then your tens, then your hundreds.

 

 

Sometimes we might have too many ones, or too many tens, to fit in the column (if they add up to more than 9) and so we have to exchange them. For example, 12 ones would be 10 + 2, and so we would end up with a new ten and 2 ones. This video reminds you of what if happening when we exchange https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xq38gn4B0l4

 

Now try these questions which include exchanging in some of the columns

 

 

Now use your understanding of place value and column addition to find the missing digits in these numbers

 

 

27.4.20 – To add and subtract 100s, 10s, and 1s

 

Remind yourself of how place value works with this lesson https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zmdpnrd

 

 

Draw your own place value charts to have a go at these questions:

 

Adding and subtracting ones

 

Adding and subtracting tens

 

 

Adding and subtracting hundreds

 

 

Now apply your knowledge to these problem solving questions

 

 

 

Week 3 Home Learning

24.4.20

 

As today is Friday it is Arithmetic day! Find the arithmetic sheet in your pack that is labelled 3.

 

Give yourself 20 minutes to complete it, you could ask an adult to set a timer for you.

 

Have fun!

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8J1fYrvH1H4 (20 minute timer link)

 

 

 

23.4.20

 

Today you will be using the knowledge that you have gained over the last 3 days and applying it to dividing by 3, 4 and 8. Remember when you are dividing by 3, 4 or 8 you are working out how many whole 3’s, 4’s or 8’s are in a given number.

 

Top Tip: 1- Remember to use your multiplication facts, it will make it easier!

               2- Draw the array to help you.

Look at the example below:

 

3 x 6 = 18

 

Therefore

 

18 divided by 3 = _______

 

 

Task 1- Using the knowledge above answer the questions below. 

 

 

Task 2- Using the knowledge that you have gained over the week, use a piece of you paper to work out the answer to the question below. 

           - Remember you need to show all of your working out, answer the question directly and explain why your answer is your answer. 

           - You can ask an adult or older sibling to talk through the question with you. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22.4.20

 

Today you will be using your knowledge of multiplying in 8’s to answer different three different questions.

 

Remember you can watch the video more than once to help you or you could draw the arrays to match each multiplication.

 

Task 1- Watch the video below.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdqAA9Ky2DY&t=45s

 

Task 2- Now answer the questions below. 

 

 

Task 3- Now test your knowledge with this question. 

 

 

 

21.4.20

 

Today you will be using your knowledge of multiplying in 4’s to answer three different questions.

 

Remember you can watch the video more than once to help you or you could draw the arrays to match each multiplication.

 

Task 1- watch the video below.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJY1_fzzM6Y

 

Task 2- Now use this knowledge to answer the questions below.

 

Top Tip: Remember to multiply (count) in 4's, watch the video again if you need to. 

              Remember you can draw the array to help you. 

 

 

Task 3- Now use all of your knowledge to answer this question below. 

 

Top Tip: Remember to use RUCSAC (Read, Understand, Choose, Solve, Answer, Check)

 

If we are looking at multiplication we will need to use the Grid method to answer the question below. Look at the help sheet below to remind you about the grid method. 

 

 

Question: 

 

 

 

 

20.4.20 - To multiply by 3

 

Today you will be using your knowledge of multiplying in 3’s to answer three different questions.

 

Remember you can watch the video more than once to help you or you could draw the arrays to match each multiplication.

 

Write your answers on one of your pieces of paper. 

 

Task 1- Watch the video below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=70aG99v704k

 

 

Task 2- Now use your knowledge to answer the 2 questions below. 

 

Top Tip- A repeated addition sentence looks like this 2 + 2 + 2 = 6 

            - Which is the same as 3 x 2 = 6 or 3 equal groups of 2 = 6 

 

 

Task 3- Apply your knowledge to this question. 

 

Remember you need to show your working out and explain why! 

 

 

 

 

________________________________

3.4.20

 

It’s Friday so that means it’s … … … arithmetic!

Find your Arithmetic Test 2 in your home learning pack and give yourself 20 minutes to complete it. When you’re done, use the answer sheet to mark it. Write your score at the top of the page. If there were any you got wrong, go back and try to fix the mistake.

 

2.4.20 – To write 3 digit numbers in numerals and words

 

Knowing how to partition a number makes it easier to write that number in words.

 

 

Use the word mat to help with spelling and fill in the missing boxes in this table:

 

 

 

1/4/20 – To partition 3 digit numbers

 

Watch this video to remind yourself about place value.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sepBmoXqYfc

 

We can represent a 3 digit number using base 10. Look at the first example. Remember the squares are the 100s, the lines are the 10s, and the dots are the ones.

 

Draw the other numbers shown here.

 

 

We can partition 3 digit numbers and make a calculation.

 

For example, 346 is 3 hundreds, 4 tens and 6 ones. I could write it as

 

346 = 300 + 40 + 6

 

Try partitioning these numbers:

 

 

 

31.3.30 – To add and subtract 10s and 100s

 

Watch this video to remind yourself what happens when we add or subtract 10s.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zau4jtSA_kY

 

This example uses base 10 to model it.

 

 

Have a go at finding 10 more (+10) or 10 less (-10) with these questions.

 

 

Remember the same happens when we add or subtract 100s; we just look at the hundreds column instead.

 

 

30.3.20 – To count in 4s, 8s, 50s, and 100s

 

When we are counting up in 4s, we are simply adding 4 each time.

When we are counting in 8s, we are adding 8 each time.

When we are counting in 50s, we are adding 50 each time.

When we are counting in 100s, we are adding 100 each time.

 

For example, in this 100 square, every 4th square is blue. This 100 square shows the numbers we say when we count in 4s.

 

 

Complete the number sequences here. The first step is to identify what the sequence is counting in (is it 4s, 8s, 50s, or 100s?). You also need to identify whether it is counting on or counting back.

 

 

27.3.20 - Arithmetic

 

Find Arithmetic paper Week 1 in your Home Learning pack and set yourself 20 minutes to complete it in. When you are finished, mark it yourself, but don't look at the answers until you have finished the whole paper! Write your score at the top of the page and keep it in your pack for when we come back to school.

26.3.2020 - comparing money

 

Today you have work on comparing money. Watch the video clip to remind you about the symbols greater than, less than and equals. 
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=tFNoEHnxPvM

 

complete your tasks on the paper you have. You can draw the coins or add them and write the value. E.g £2.15 > £1.99

Remember each symbol!

25.3.20 - Adding money and finding change

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/supermovers/ks2-maths-handling-money-and-giving-change-with-the-next-step/zjr6kmn

Watch this video about adding money and finding change. Join in with the dance moves if you can!

 

This will help you when solving the money challenge today. Remember to find change it is often better to count on mentally or using a number line. See the examples below.

 

 

 

24.3.20 - Addition with Money

 

Use your addition skills to help you solve the following problems. Some you may be able to do in your head, but for others you will need a number line or column method. Use the coins at the bottom of the page to remind yourself of which coins we can use.

 

23.3.20

Use the paper in your pack and this list of coins below.

 

1. What is the most amount of money Ben could have?

 

2. What is the least amount of money Ben could have?

 

3. Write down ALL of the possibilities.

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